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Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of High-level waste borosilicate glass found in the catalog.

High-level waste borosilicate glass

High-level waste borosilicate glass

a compendium of corrosion characteristics

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Waste Management, Office of Eastern Waste Management Operations, High-Level Waste Division, Available from National Technical Information Service in [Washington, D.C.?], [Springfield, VA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Glass -- Corrosion -- Testing.,
  • Radioactive wastes.,
  • Hazardous wastes -- Solidification.,
  • Radioactive waste disposal in the ground.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJ.K. Bates ... [et al.] ; compiled and edited by J.C. Cunnane.
    ContributionsCunnane, J. C., Bates, John K., United States. Dept. of Energy. High-level Waste Division.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination3 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18076171M

    "Liquidus Temperature of High-Level Waste Borosilicate Glasses with Spinel Primary Phase." In Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXIII, Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, edited by Robert W. Smith; David W. Shoesmith, , Kinetics of Conversion of High-Level Waste to Glass, P. Izak, P. Hrma, and M. J. Schweiger The Nature of the Self-Luminescence Observed from Borosilicate Glass doped with Es, Zerihun Assefa and Richard G. Haire

    Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management Preparation and Characterization of an Improved High Level Radioactive Waste (HAW) Borosilicate Glass. Pages Guber, W. (et al.) Preview Buy Chap19 Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management Book Subtitle. You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

    Borosilicate glass was first investigated as a waste immobilisation matrix in Canada in the s. In the s and s, France, the US and the UK made the decision to begin vitrifying their HLW in borosilicate glasses, due to their increasingly large inventories of defence and civil nuclear wastes. Safe disposal of high level nuclear reactor wastes ISBN 0 6 1. Radioactive waste disposal. I. Title borosilicate glass, followed by deep burial in geological forma­ strategy involves adding about 5 to 10 per cent of high-level radioactive waste to the SYNROC mixture of perovskite, Ba­ Cited by:


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High-level waste borosilicate glass Download PDF EPUB FB2

@article{osti_, title = {High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3}, author = {Cunnane, J C and Bates, J K and Bradley, C R}, abstractNote = {The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release Cited by: @article{osti_, title = {High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics.

Volume 2}, author = {Cunnane, J C and Bates, J K and Bradley, C R}, abstractNote = {The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release.

Borosilicate glass is a type of glass with silica and boron trioxide as the main glass-forming constituents. Borosilicate glasses are known for having very low coefficients of thermal expansion (≈3 × 10 −6 K −1 at 20 °C), making them more resistant to thermal shock than any other common glass.

Such glass is subjected to less thermal stress and can withstand temperature differentials. High-level radioactive sludge at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be processed at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) into durable borosilicate glass wasteforms.

Silicon is the main glass-forming element in a borosilicate waste glass and its basic elements are SiO 4 tetrahedra, which comprise bridging or cross-linking and non-bridging atoms of oxygen (NBO).

In a silicate glass the SiO 4-tetrahedra vertices connect these elements to each other through bridging oxygen atoms so that the network consists of chains of various lengths. principal glass waste streams in terms of mass is summarised in Table Despite the variation in the source years and assumptions for the data presented, the many orders of magnitude difference between the three waste streams illustrate the dominant position that recycling container glass, compared with flat glass, can play in the recycling challenge to reduce the environmental and resource.

As early as the s, glass was considered an important potential waste form for radioactive materials. The technology of glass formation has a long history that can be traced back to ancient times, and borosilicate glasses have been used since early in this century.

A historical summary of the development of glass as a waste form and the. The method consists of mixing the high-level waste (HLW) with glass powders (''frit"), melting the mixture at high temperature (e.g., zirconia and alumina) of INEEL HLW calcines and SBW.

Various borosilicate glass compositions were melted at 1, °C for 4 hours and their properties (e.g., viscosity, liquidus temperature, and chemical. In the United States the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina is the free world's largest facility for the immobilisation of high level nuclear waste in borosilicate Author: John Plodinec.

Get this from a library. High-level waste borosilicate glass: a compendium of corrosion characteristics. [J C Cunnane; John K Bates; United States.

Department of Energy. High-level Waste Division.;]. High-level radioactive waste management concerns how radioactive materials created during production of nuclear power and nuclear weapons are dealt with. Radioactive waste contains a mixture of short-lived and long-lived nuclides, as well as non-radioactive nuclides.

There was reported s tonnes of high-level nuclear waste stored in the United States The Characterization and Dissolution of High Level Waste Calcine in Alkali Borosilicate Glass S. Morgan Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield, SI 3JD, UKAuthor: S.

Morgan, P.B. Rose, R.J. Hand, N.C. Hyatt, W.E. Lee, C. Scales. Ruthenium (Ru) was removed from molten borosilicate glass containing simulated radioactive waste by using tin as the solvent metal.

The metal and glass phases were separated from each other and examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy–energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). This is the first publication to draw information on nuclear waste forms for high-level wastes together into a single volume.

Although borosilicate glass has become the standard waste form, additional research in this compound is still necessary. nuclear waste disposal Download nuclear waste disposal or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format.

This is the first publication to draw information on nuclear waste forms for high-level wastes together into a single volume. Although borosilicate glass has become the standard waste form, additional research in this compound.

Guber W., Hussain M., Kahl L., Ondracek G., Saidl J. () Preparation and Characterization of an Improved High Level Radioactive Waste (HAW) Borosilicate Glass. In: McCarthy G.J. et al. (eds) Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste : W. Guber, M. Hussain, L. Kahl, G. Ondracek, J. Saidl.

High-level radioactive waste (HLW) can be stored in underground carbon-steel tanks. However, radioactive waste must also be further immobilized to ensure our safety.

There are several sites in the United States where high-level radioactive waste (HLW) are stored; including the Savannah River Site (SRS), established in to produce plutonium Format: Paperback. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Alternatives for High-Level Waste Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site by National Research Council Staff, Cesium Processing Alternatives for High-Level Waste at the Savannah River Site Committee, Board on Radioactive Waste Management Staff and Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology Staff (, Paperback) at the.

Wait and see if we can prevent water from generating colloids and leaching waste from borosilicate glass. 10 Wait and see if we can devise a way to render radioactive materials less harmful.

Wait and see if we can resolve some of the uncertainty and inequity problems treated earlier in. Free Online Library: Glass, glass-ceramics and glasses for immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes.(Brief article, Book review) by "SciTech Book News"; Publishing industry Library and information science Science and technology, general Books Book reviews.

Formulation, Testing, and Structural Characterization of High-Zirconium High-Level Waste Glasses - Volume - David A. McKeown, Isabelle S. Muller, Andrew C. Buechele, Ian L.

Pegg, Christopher A. Kendziora, Charles R. ScalesCited by: 4.A crystal‐tolerant glass approach is being developed for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant at the Hanford Site in Washington State with a goal to maximize the loading of high‐level waste in borosilicate glass without jeopardizing melter operation by Cited by: 2.End waste forms and quality control in calcination and vitrification processes.

Future trends. Chapter 6: Historical development of glass and ceramic waste forms for high level radioactive wastes. Abstract: Introduction. Borosilicate glass development in the United States. Borosilicate glass development in France.